How to Run Like a Marathoner

How to Run Like a Marathoner

Running clothing is also important, especially in the summer weather. High tech fabrics that help wick sweat and dry quickly make running more comfortable. They also reduce chafing, blisters, and keep you cooler. Your local running store may also be of help with training information, run nutrition, and races in your area.






Here are some other training tips that will help you towards your goal:



  1. Replace shoes every 500 miles or so. If not, you risk injury, including stress fracture or plantar fasciitis (painful heel injury), says Aragon. If your shoe’s cushion feels soft, it’s time to go shopping. A running specialty store can even evaluate your shoes.
  2. Start slow. Focusing on speed early on can be discouraging and lead to injuries. So keep the pace easy — you should be able to hold a conversation while you run — and alternate between running and walking until your body adapts. If you’re completely out of breath at any point during your run, you’re probably moving too fast.
  3. No, you don’t need to carb-load. Serious runners often need more carbohydrates and protein than the average Jane, but as a newbie, you don’t need to overhaul your
  4. Consistency counts. You start out planning a daily run, then life gets in the way. Too many people throw in the towel after a few mishaps. When you miss a day, get back on the horse. That’s life. Get back to your running.
  5. Monitor your resting heart rate. Take your resting pulse each morning before arising. Keep track of it in your training log. After several readings, you will have a baseline number. As our fitness improves, our resting pulse decreases. If you see your resting heart rate spike up by 10% or more above your normal resting pulse, take it easy that day. This can be a sign of fatigue, lack of recovery between workouts, or an illness coming on and it is best to take the day off, sleep in, or change a hard workout to a very easy one, until your resting heart rate returns to normal.
  6. Cross-train. Strengthening your core helps your running. Practice yoga or swim laps. You’ll also build your upper body, legs and cardiovascular system. Keep your gym membership for night treadmill runs, adds Richardson.
  7. Warm up with a brisk five-minute walk to get your muscles ready to do their thing. You can also throw in some dynamic stretches (like high knees or butt kicks), but save the static stretches (like touching your toes, etc.) until after your run.
  8. Always listen to your body. If you are tired, rest. If a workout feels hard, it is hard.